Last edited by Shakanos
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Caribou and muskoxen habitat studies found in the catalog.

Caribou and muskoxen habitat studies

Richard H. Russell

Caribou and muskoxen habitat studies

by Richard H. Russell

  • 335 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Environmental-Social Program, Northern Pipelines in Ottawa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Caribou.,
  • Muskox.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementR.H. Russell, E. Janet Edmonds, J. Roland.
    SeriesESCOM report -- no. AI-26, INA publication -- no. QS-8160-026-EE-A1
    ContributionsEdmonds, E. Janet., Roland, J., Environmental-Social Program, Northern Pipelines (Canada), Canada. Fisheries and Environment Canada., Arctic Islands Pipeline Program (Canada)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 140 p. :
    Number of Pages140
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18311550M

    The work was a collaboration with The US Geological Survey on lands managed by the State of Alaska, Bureau of Land Management and US Fish and Wildlife Service. Lindsay now works as a science writer. Keith works as a biologist for the State of Alaska on caribou, moose, and muskoxen. Read more. WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Department of Interior’s decision to proceed with opening up the “crown jewel” of the nation’s wildlife refuge system to oil and gas development is a threat to iconic arctic wildlife and to the indigenous communities that depend on this pristine land. The release of.

      Books Design Food “You could protect the habitat and stop all logging and [caribou] would still go extinct,” Serrouya says. points out that even decade-long conservation studies.   Muskoxen, raindeer, caribou and other Arctic mammals are likely all being stressed by climate change, but more Arctic research is required to determine specific stressors, their .

      Muskoxen and blesbok are larger bodied, have greater rumen-reticulum capacity, and greater relative size of the cecum-colon than their habitat counterparts, caribou and impala. On average, muskoxen are about twice as heavy as caribou (Klein , Staaland and Olesen ), and blesbok are, on average, about one-half again as heavy as impala. Muskox or Muskoxen are a prehistoric looking animal that thrives in the cold climate of Alaska's high Arctic slopes. They can survive these severe conditions in part due to their dense undercoat of woolly fur called qiviut, which is said to have an insulation factor 10 times that of wool. They have changed little since the ice age.


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Caribou and muskoxen habitat studies by Richard H. Russell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Caribou need plenty of space to migrate and to avoid predators. Having a lot of acreage can allow the caribou to keep moving and stay ahead of the predators. If there are areas where food supply is “interrupted” by certain human influences, then the food supply is separated into pockets. Mother Caribou discovers a baby musk ox that has become separated from its herd and takes it in to raise with her own caribou baby.

This is not a warm-hearted story of a loving adopted family: as with the Andersen fairy tale, t Tamara Campeau’s illustrations beautifully evoke the Arctic habitat in which the caribou and musk oxen live/5.

Larter, N.C. and J.A. Nagy. Peary caribou, muskoxen and Banks Island forage: assessing seasonal diet similarities. Rangifer 17(1) Larter, N.C. and J.A. Nagy. Arctic island caribou habitat, PpPopulation and habitat viability assessment workshop for the Peary caribou (Rangifer tarandus pearyi)-Briefing Book.

Muskoxen may support higher wolf densities which could, in turn, result in higher predation rates on Peary caribou (Nagy et al., ; Gunn, ). More studies are required to elucidate the mechanism(s) affecting patterns of space use and population dynamics between muskoxen and Peary : Samarth Kaluskar, Cheryl Ann Johnson, E.

Agnes Blukacz-Richards, Félix Ouellet, Dong-Kyun Kim, Georg. Lichens in the Yukon support the Caribou, Musk Ox and other hoofed animals throughout the winter. In fact, Caribou are one of the few animals that have special microorganisms in their stomach which allows them to digest the lichens. Current Uses: Lichens are commercially grown in Scandinavia as a thickener for the food industry.

Varestrongylus eleguneniensis (Nematoda; Protostrongylidae) is a recently described species of lungworm that infects caribou (Rangifer tarandus), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) and moose (Alces americanus) across northern North we explore the geographic distribution of V.

eleguneniensis through geographically extensive sampling and discuss the biogeography of this. The insular population of barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) on Coats Island, Northwest Territories, is ultimately limited by winter food study was undertaken to assess forage biomass available during summer and to determine the.

Muskoxen Abundance and Distribution, and Caribou Distribution and Calving Areas on Boothia Peninsula, Nunavut (Status Report No, ) (view report) Muskoxen Distribution and Abundance in the Area West of the Coppermine River, Kitikmeot Region, Nunavut (Status Report, No, ). Peary caribou, muskoxen and Banks Island forage: assessing seasonal diet similarities.

Rangifer 17(1) Larter, N. C., et J. Nagy. Arctic island caribou habitat, pagePopulation and habitat viability assessment workshop for the Peary caribou (Rangifer tarandus pearyi)-Briefing Book. Conservation Breeding Specialist. Muskoxen are one of many species of animals in the refuge "This plan could devastate the amazing array of wildlife that call the refuge home through noise pollution, habitat destruction, oil spills, and more climate chaos," Kristen Monsell, from the.

This edited book offers a comprehensive overview of health and diseases in reindeer and caribou and represents an important tool for veterinarians and biologists to understand and manage these vast animal populations. Reindeer and Caribou also will be relevant to researchers dealing with wildlife diseases.

Contents - Preface - Introduction. Caribou A. Porcupine Caribou Herd Muskoxen The population of muskoxen in northeastern Alaska and northwestern Canada declined between andand muskoxen almost disappeared from the Arctic Refuge.

Studies of how and why post-breeding shorebirds use coastal habitats will help Refuge Managers protect the birds in the face of. Discovery and Description of the “Davtiani” Morphotype for Teladorsagia boreoarcticus (Trichostrongyloidea: Ostertagiinae) Abomasal Parasites In Muskoxen, Ovibos moschatus, and Caribou, Rangifer tarandus, from the North American Arctic: Implications for Parasite Faunal Diversity.

Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 98, Issue. 2, p. The muskox (Ovibos moschatus, in Latin "musky sheep-ox"), also spelled musk ox and musk-ox (in Inuktitut: ᐅᒥᖕᒪᒃ, umingmak; in Woods Cree: ᒫᖨᒨᐢ, mâthi-môs, ᒫᖨᒧᐢᑐᐢ, mâthi-mostos), is an Arctic hoofed mammal of the family Bovidae, noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor emitted by males during the seasonal rut, from which its name derives.

Caribou are native to North America, whereas reindeer are native to northern Europe and Asia. Alaska does have some reindeer, however, imported from Siberia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Both caribou and muskoxen had increased in numbers in the three decades that had preceded the study (Ferguson and Gauthier, ; D. Kaomayok, pers. comm. All species resided in the study area throughout the year except the caribou, which were present only.

habitat appears to be widespread and future transplants to the. substantial studies have sh own significant separation in plant.

species preference, geographic and seasonal range ds The fact that muskoxen and caribou have coexisted for. "It's home to an amazing array of wildlife, including polar bears, caribou, Arctic foxes, brown and black bears, muskoxen, rare plants and about species of birds.

Caribou Facts: Introduction. Caribou live In northern and Arctic regions of North America, Europe and Asia. Typical caribou habitat includes tundra (land with permanently frozen soil in which few plants can grow) and Boreal forests (northern pine forests).

These cold, harsh environments are home to approximately million caribou worldwide. Studies of radio collared caribou have demonstrated use of the area between the Canning and Sadlerochit Rivers within the Area from early July to mid-August. This was particularly true inwhen the majority of the CAH moved east of the Canning River to feed and seek insect relief during this period.

these early studies, tentatively identified four caribou populations in northwestern Alaska and estimated that they contained ,caribou. Subsequent studies by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game revealed that only one caribou .polar bear denning habitat wildlife species, including polar bears, musk oxen, the Porcupine caribou herd, and millions of birds.

Oil development would Studies also show that as roads and.muskoxen for Axel Heiberg Island and 10 for Amund Ringnes. In Aprilthe number of Peary caribou on Lougheed Island was estimated at 56 (Miller et al.

). Only one caribou was seen in April (Miller et al. ). Constant with the survey, no muskoxen .